Monday, 28 July 2014

Sangihe Dwarf-kingfisher classified as Critically Endangered.


Birdlife International published an assessment of the conservation status of 350 newly described Bird Species for the  International Union for the Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species on 24 July 2014, the first such assessment by the organization. 25% of the species described are considered to be threatened, compared to about 13% of all known bird species, though this is in part due to the discovery of cryptic species; populations of birds formerly thought to be part of more widespread species, that are now understood to be genetically distinct species, incapable of reproduction with the species of which they were thought to form a population. Such cryptic species have smaller populations and more restricted ranges than they were previously thought to have, and therefore are more likely to be threatened.

One such newly described species is the Sangihe Dwarf Kingfisher (Ceyx sangirensis) formerly thought to be a population of the Sulawesi Dwarf Kingfisher (Ceyx fallax) but reclessified in the 2014 edition of the HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. The Sangihe Dwarf Kingfisher is a small Kingfisher (about 13 cm) with a bright red beak, a black cap speckled with blue, lilac cheeks, white neck patch and throat, orange underparts, brown wings and a blue back and tail.

The Sangihe Dwarf Kingfisher (Ceyx sangirensis). John Gerrard Keulemans (1842-1912)/Wikimedia Commons.

The Sangihe Dwarf Kingfisher has not been sighted since 1997, despite searches in 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2009 and 2014. It is native to lowland forests on Sangehi (Indonesia) and possibly the neighbouring island of Taub. However the indigenous forests of Sangehi have been almost entirely cleared to make ways for agriculture, making it likely that any remaining population will be extremely small.

The former range of the Sangihe Dwarf Kingfisher (Ceyx sangirensis) (yellow). International Union for the Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species.

See also...


Birdlife International published an assessment of the conservation status of 350 newly described Bird Species for International Union for the Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species on 24 July 2014, the first such assessment by the organization. 25% of...



Birdlife International published an assessment of the conservation status of 350 newly described Bird Species for International Union for the Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species on 24 July 2014, the first such assessment by the organization. 25% of the species described are considered to be threatened, compared to about 13% of all known bird species, though this is in part due to the discovery of cryptic species; populations of birds formerly thought to be part of...



Birdlife International published an assessment of the conservation status of 350 newly described Bird Species for International Union for the Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species on 24 July 2014, the first such assessment by the organization. 25% of...


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