Sunday, 27 July 2014

Bugun Liocichla classified as Critically Endangered.

Birdlife International published an assessment of the conservation status of 350 newly described Bird Species for International Union for the Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species on 24 July 2014, the first such assessment by the organization. 25% of the species described are considered to be threatened, compared to about 13% of all known bird species, though this is in part due to the discovery of cryptic species; populations of birds formerly thought to be part of more widespread species, that are now understood to be genetically distinct species, incapable of reproduction with the species of which they were thought to form a population. Such cryptic species have smaller populations and more restricted ranges than they were previously thought to have, and therefore are more likely to be threatened.

One such newly described species is the Bugun Liocichla (Liocichla bugunorum) a small Passerine Bird known only from Arunachal Pradesh State in India that was first described in 2006 by Ramana Athreya of the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research. The Bugun Liocichla is a small olive-grey Babbler (a group of Passerine Birds found in Asia and Australia, which are now thought to be polyphyletic - not all closely related), with a black cap, yellow/orange markings on the face and black, yellow and red markings on the wings and tail.

The Bugun Liocichla (Liocichla bugunorum). Wikipedia.

The species is known only from three populations within the Eaglenest Wildlife Sanctuary, with a total of 14 known living individuals. It is possible that the species survives elsewhere in India, Bhutan or China, but given its distinctive plumage and vocalizations, it is surprising that it has not been recorded. All recorded observations have occurred on disturbed hillsides with a mixture of scrub, small trees and bamboo, within a wider area of canopy forest. It is unclear if the species is threatened by human activity in the area, such as logging, tourism and spreading settlements, or whether the disturbed land is a more optimal habitat than the original forest (in which case it is unclear where the Bird naturally occurs).

The known range of the Bugun Liocichla (Liocichla bugunorum), yellow areas. International Union for the Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species.

See also...


Birdlife International published an assessment of the conservation status of 350 newly described Bird Species for International Union for the Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species on 24 July 2014, the first such assessment by the organization. 25% of the species described are considered to be threatened, compared to about 13% of all known bird species, though this is in part due...




Birdlife International published an assessment of the conservation status of 350 newly described Bird Species for International Union for the Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species on...




Passerines (Perching Birds) are the most numerous and successful group of Birds in the modern world, with over half of all known Bird species being Passerines, including Finches, Thrushes, Sparrows, Warblers and Crows. Despite their success the group do not have an extensive fossil record, largely due to their small and delicate bones. The oldest putative Passerine...



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