Tuesday, 23 June 2015

Landslide kills five in Maharashtra State, India.

Five people have reportedly died following a landslide which destroyed the home in which they were staying in the village of Mohechiwadi in the Raigad District of Maharashtra State, India, on Monday 22 June 2015. The incident happened at about 6.25 am local time, following a period of intense rain, and all the victims are thought to be related. Landslides are a common problem after severe weather events, as excess pore water pressure can overcome cohesion in soil and sediments, allowing them to flow like liquids. Approximately 90% of all landslides are caused by heavy rainfall. The deceased are thought to have ranged from 18 to 75, and to have included two men and three women. They have been identified locally as four members of the Dighe family, plus another relative who was staying with them.

The approximate location of the 22 June 2015 Mohechiwadi landslide. Google Maps.

Maharashtra State has a monsoon climate, with the rains typically arriving around the start of June and peaking in July. The area around Mohechiwadi typically receives over 500 mm of rain in June and over 1300 mm in July, and the area suffers frequent landslip and flooding events. This situation is made worse by widespread deforestation and quarrying for construction materials (much of it illegal) which tends to destabilize hill slopes.

See also...

At least 41 people have died and between 120 and 350 are missing after a landslide destroyed the village of Malin, about 80 km north of Pune in Maharashtra State, on the morning of Wednesday 30 July 2014...

Parts of the Indian city of Mumbai are suffering from flooding after being hit by a series of freak waves on Thursday 12 June 2014. The waves occurred around high tide, and rose over four meters above expected levels, inundating low lying coastal parts of the city...

Five people have died following a landslide in the Antop Hill area of central Mumbai on Wednesday 10 July 2013. The incident happened at around 7.40 am local time (around 2.10 am GMT), when a large boulder...


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