Sunday, 1 March 2015

A new species of Rove Beetle from Jalisco State, Mexico.


Rove Beetles of the genus Megarthrus are Fungus-feeding Beetles distributed globally, but are most numerous and diverse in north-temperate regions. In the tropics they are largely restricted to high altitude regions, leading to a large number of highly endemic species (species with very limited geographical ranges).

In a paper published in the journal Zootaxa on 13 February 2015, William Rodríguez and José Navarrete-Heredia of the Centro de Estudios en Zoología at the Universidad de Guadalajara describe a new species of Megarthrus from Jalisco State in Mexico.

The new species is named Megarthrus alatorreorum, in honour of Patricia Guillermina Alatorre Delgado and the Alatorre family in general for their ‘hospitality, respect and affection’. The Beetles were found in an Oak-Pine forest at altitudes of 2400-2800 m above sea-level, where they were captured in pit traps baited with squid, though they are not thought to be carnivorous. They range from 1.5-1.7 mm in length, and are dark brown in colour with paler appendages.

Megarthrus alatorreorum in dorsal view. Scale bar is 1 mm. Rodríguez & Navarrete-Heredia (2015).

See also…

Rove Beetles (Staphylinidae) are an unusual-looking group of Beetles, distinguished by their short wing cases, which makes them look rather unbeetle-like. They are a successful group, with over 46 000...

A new species of Marsh Rove Beetle from Japan.
Rove Beetles (Staphylinidae) are an unusual-looking group of Beetles, distinguished by their short wing cases, which makes them look rather...


A Rove Beetle from the Late Triassic of Virginia.
The Beetles are generally considered to be the most successful group of Insects, with over 360 000 known species and a fossil record that dates back to the Permian (or possibly the Carboniferous, depending on which experts you talk to). They are thought to...


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