Tuesday, 13 January 2015

Asteroid (410088) 2007 EJ passes the Earth.

Asteroid (410088) 2007 EJ passed by the Earth at a distance of about 26 500 000 km (68.9 times the average distance between the Earth and the Moon, or 17.7% of the average distance between the Sun and the Earth), slightly after 7.50 am GMT on Moday 12 January 2015. There was no danger of the asteroid hitting us, though were it to do so it would have presented a serious threat. (410088) 2007 EJ has an estimated equivalent diameter of 1.1 km (i.e. it is estimated that a spherical object with the same volume would be 1.1 km in diameter), and an object of this size would be predicted to be capable of passing through the Earth's atmosphere relatively intact, impacting the ground with an energy equivalent to about 50  000 megatons of TNT (roughly 3 000 000 times the energy of the Hiroshima bomb). Such an event would result in a crater about 15 km across, cause devastation on a global scale and would have the potential to affect the climate globally for centuries after the impact event.

 The calculated orbit of (410088) 2007 EJ. JPL Small Body Database Browser.

 (410088) 2007 EJ was discovered on 9 March 2007 by the University of Arizona's Mt. Lemmon Survey at the Steward Observatory on Mount Lemmon in the Catalina Mountains north of Tucson. The designation 2007 EJ implies that it was the 9th asteroid (asteroid J) discovered in the first half of March 2007 (period 2007). The longer number, 410088, implies that it was the 410 088th asteroid ever discovered. This longer designation is not given to asteroids straight away, to avoid duplicate or false sightings.

(410088) 2007 EJ has a 1443 day year orbital period and an eccentric orbit tilted at an angle of 7.29° to the plane of the Solar System, which takes it from 0.93 AU from the Sun (i.e. 93% of the average distance at which the Earth orbits the Sun) to 4.07 AU from the Sun (i.e. 407% of the average distance at which the Earth orbits the Sun, considerably more than twice the distance at which the planet Mars orbits the Sun). It is therefore classed as an Apollo Group Asteroid (an asteroid that is on average further from the Sun than the Earth, but which does get closer). This also means that close encounters between (410088) 2007 EJ and the Earth are fairly common, with the last having occured in February 2011 and the next predicted for November 2018.

See also...
 
http://sciencythoughts.blogspot.co.uk/2015/01/fireball-over-bucharest.htmlFireball over Bucharest                          Witnesses reported seening a large fireball over Bucharest, Romania, at about 3.00 am local time on Thursday 7 January 2015. The event is reported to have lasted several seconds, and to have lit up the sky 'like...
http://sciencythoughts.blogspot.co.uk/2015/01/asteroid-1999-jv6-passes-earth.htmlAsteroid 1999 JV6 passes the Earth.          Asteroid 1999 JV6 passed by the Earth at a distance of about 12 460 000 km (32.42 times the average distance between the Earth and the Moon, or 8.3% of the average distance between the Sun and the Earth)...
http://sciencythoughts.blogspot.co.uk/2015/01/asteroid-2005-yq96-passes-earth.htmlAsteroid 2005 YQ96 passes the Earth.     Asteroid 2005 YQ96 passed by the Earth at a distance of about 3 967 000 km (10.32 times the average distance between the Earth and the Moon, or 2.7% of the average distance between the Sun and the Earth)...
 
Follow Sciency Thoughts on Facebook.


No comments:

Post a Comment